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43 different reasons to play tennis

1.There is no better sport than tennis 2.Tennis creates honesty 3.It is worth to fight till the end as well in the sport like in the life 4.Positive discharge of energy excess 5.Formation of character and self-confidence 6.The competition, adrenaline, endorphins 7.Because tennis is also the elegance and aggression, technique and strength, grace and speed 8.Development of motor coordination and willingness to life 9.Because it is a sport full of emotions 10.Improves reflexes, strengthens muscles. 11.Because of love to the sport and dream to learn to play it 12.It is a great sport beloved by fans all around the world 13.It is worth to play to achieve goals 14.To serve like Ivo Karlovic, to play forehand like Roger Federer, to smile like Agnieszka Radwanska 15.Watching the greatest of tennis is making smile and give lots of energy 16.It gives pleasure 17.Tennis is wonderful state of mind 18.Exercise psyche and ability to act in stressful situations 19.Strong legs, strong arms and hands 20.Prestigous sport 21.Allows you to get a taste of victory or defeat 22.Teaches humility 23.It’s great to have fans 24.Satisfaction from what you are doing and what you can do 25.Helps to burn fat 26.It prevents diseases such as diabetes, obesity, heart disease, vascular and osteoporosis 27.We can begin to play as a child and play all life and literally start learning at any age 28.Game requires concentration...

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Interview with Younes El Aynaoui

Interview with Younes El Aynaoui – former professional tennis player from Morocco. Five-time singles winner on the ATP Tour. He reached his career-high singles ranking in the world #14 in March 2003, at the age of 31. Part of the great Davis Cup team combined also of Karim Alami and Hiszam Arazi. By Jan Stanski You speak 6 languages. Arabic, English, French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish. When did you learn them and how it is possible to have so big talent not only for tennis but also for languages? Yes, most of them I learn by traveling around the world. Nobody spoke arabic on tour, so to communicate I had to speak the other languages to players. Spanish I learn when I was leaving for 8 years in Spain and also had an Argentinian coach for a few years. My mother is French, so it’s my second language. Learned italian by talking to people, even if I didn’t know the language that good, I was trying. You were in Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy for two years (1990-1992). We found information that you were working hard to pay for your stay there. You drove the bus, cleaned the gym, watched kids in their room, strung rackets, tossed practice balls to campers, and helped to babysit younger players.  What can you say more about this period in your life? What’s your memories?...

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Tennis Legends: Stefan Edberg – personality is also style

By Jan Stanski Bjorn Borg, Mats Wilander, Stefan Edberg, Magnus Norman, Thomas Enqvist, Thomas Johansson, Robin Soderling. Tennis fans all around the world know these names – the names of the glory of Swedish tennis. Stefan Edberg was one of the most prominent serve and volley player ever. The 48-year old Swede is now back in the game as coach of Roger Federer and the team is called “Fedberg”. His impact on Roger’s caused the title in Dubai #78 in the career. The recent one before was in Halle last year and then most of the observers stand for being skeptical about next achievements of Swiss Maestro especially for winning Slam… and then came Stefan! One of the common points of these two gentlemen is style of elegance and fair play as well as on and off the court. Roger was honored many times to gain the special ATP Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award like the last year at the end of the season. The Swiss, after couple of training sessions with Swede, believed in him and that he will rebuild his game, attitude, motivation and will to win next matches. It seems like the magic worked out. With 806 winnings in the career, 41 singles titles including 6 Slams, 18 doubles titles, being #1 ranked player for 72 weeks,  4 times Davis Cup winner, Olympic bronze medalist , “the...

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INTERVIEW with Kim Tillikainen, Jerzy Janowicz’s coach

By Leszek Rudz What is like to work with Jerzy and how does your cooperation look like? We have known each other for many years and we have a good chemistry between us. It took some time for me to realize how I have to work with Jerzy and what kind of coaching approach I need to have to help him to get his potential out. Jerzy has a special character, which is his strength in tennis and that’s also partly why we created him a special, little bit unique game style. We have spent lot of time together. We shared a room for many years and we have eaten meals together thousands of times. I do not know if there are too many coach-player relationships as close as our is. We can talk about everything and there is a special bond between us. We often even know what the other one is thinking of, or what the other one will say next. What are the goals you set up together for the season 2014? The goals are based on his game style. We do not talk about ranking goals almost at all. Last half a year the goals have been to make him healthy enough to play tournaments and we didn’t have opportunity to work on his game that much. I truly hope Jerzy would stay healthy now...

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The tennis legends: Pete Sampras – lord of the grass courts

By Jan Stanski In the breakthrough period of 90’s and far then American tennis has its boom time because of great tennis players like Pete Sampras – the mastering champion of Wimbledon, Andre Agassi – with his one of the best return in the history,  Jim Courier – great clay court player,  Michael Chang – the youngest Grand Slam champion and Todd Martin – the one of the tallest competitior on the court and big server. All of this players lifted the level of the game for spectacular. The first one born in Washington and growing up in California started swinging racquet at the age of 3 and… achieved the 14-time Grand Slam championship. One of the best of Wimbledon and US Open player ever. His worst tournament of majors was French Open but the lack of winnings in this case was fulfilled by Courier, Chang and Agassi. Sampras with his Greek roots made with one year older Agassi one of the most fascinating rivalries in the history of tennis in general – having overall 34 of clashes, 20 wins for Sampras and 14 for Agassi. Started professional career in 1988 when he was sixteen! The first match versus Agassi in 1989 he lost earning only three games but in his first important US Open and last performance in New York he beaten in finals the man from Las...

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The coaching spotlight. Adrian Rattenbury: Tennis is forever changing!

By Jan Stanski Photo: Adrian Rattenbury Jan Stanski: What was the genesis of RPT and what was the reason you decided to set up the tennis coaches organization? Adrian Rattenbury: The RPT was established 25 years ago having identified there was a need for coaches and employers to have a standardised training method and certification programme which met the needs of the employer and the knowledge for the coach. At the time the Founders of the RPT were managing a number of tennis facilities, clubs and coaches in Europe and realised that it was very difficult to manage and monitor the success of the coaching programme as the coaches did not have a standard teaching method or an agreed system. As such the experience and opportunity for the players varied greatly between club and coach. It was based on this experience that it was decided that there should be a coaching method and system which could be used by coaches that provided a recognised level of quality and the experience for the players was of a high and consistent standard How many coaches belong to RPT and what kind of programs you offer for the participants? The RPT have trained over 50,000 coaches and tennis teachers worldwide and currently have around 18,500 members in 121 countries. We offer a whole. We have delivered almost 4,000 courses and through our...

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Lukasz Kubot – the last of the Mohicans

Written by Jan Stanski Till the great performance of Jerzy Janowicz in Paris Bercy Lukasz Kubot was the long time polish number one tennis player in the world. He is well known for his afterall dance called “cancan” or serve&volley strategy. Thats why he is the one and only because his game even not so effective is very liked by older fans of tennis especially Wimbledon fans – the ones remembering Stefan Edberg or Patrick Rafter “trips” to the net. Beautiful style. Good old game. But not always effective as attractive.   The man from Boleslawiec (Lukas was born there) although he was growing up in Lubin is very appreciated doubles player. He was the one to get text message from experienced Swede – Robert Lindstedt to play together in this year’s Aussie Open at Melbourne Park. The debut of never playing before polish-swedish duo was tremendous. They won six matches and triumphed in Grand Slam for the first time in careers of both players. Even Lindstedt had before three finals the fortune comes to him with Lukas Kubot. “Luki” – because its Lukas nickname – admitted that he prolonged his time on the court after unexpected quarterfinal at Wimbledon last year when he lost in polish match against Jerzy Janowicz. The dream came true for him that day even he lost. He was dreaming to join to the...

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20 golden rules of Allistair McCaw for great performance

Allistair McCaw is world class fitness coach, sports performance specialist, contributor of the book „Tennis Mental Game Secrets”, in year 2013 he run 12 marathons in 12 months in different cities of the world, speaker on prestigious Australian Tennis Coaches Conference right before the Aussie Open, created exceptional formula of training called McCaw Method, for more take a look on his fanpage: facebook/McCawMethod Words of wisdom: 1. Don’t limit your challenges, Challenge your limits. 2. The best thing about the past is that it shows you what not to bring into your future. 3. One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation. 4. Athletes who succeed are the ones who listen and absorb what their coaches teach. They yearn to learn. 5. Never drop your standards because it offends someone, In fact keep raising them. Don’t let anything or anyone hold you back from reaching your goals. 6. To be a winner, you must plan to win, prepare to win, & expect to win. 7. We can’t always control what happens to us in life, but we can control our attitude towards it. 8. Progress is made by taking steps, sometimes big, sometimes small. The key is to keep taking them! 9. Discipline is not punishment. Discipline is doing what needs to be done, at the right time, to the best of your...

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RECOVERING FROM LOSSES

By Allen Fox, Ph.D. c 2010, all rights reserved When I played on the tour (in the pre-Open Era, before money augmented glory), I loved almost every aspect of the game. Tournaments were exciting because each held the initial promise of victory, and practicing was a joy because I saw it as a pathway to winning. Besides that, I just liked hitting the ball, competing, and the camaraderie of the players. There was only one terribly unpleasant feature of the game – losing! After a loss, especially if it was a close match and I had blown chances to win, I was in agony. I didn?t want to talk to anybody and usually hid out alone in my room – brooding. There I relived every crucial error in excruciating detail. The misery lasted for hours, sometimes days. Even now, though I play only for exercise and enjoyment, I still hate losing. Was this helpful? Yes, in some ways. It highlighted weaknesses in my game so I was always clear about what areas needed work. The pain motivated me to practice harder and longer. It also kept me going in long, hot, difficult matches, because I knew what awaited me if I gave up. At the same time, however, it was quite destructive in other ways. It increased the pressure to win, and this made me more likely to choke....

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THE DIFFICULTIES IN CONTROLLING EMOTIONS ON COURT

By Allen Fox, Ph.D. c 2012, all rights reserved Coaches are often frustrated when their players blow matches they should win simply because they become angry, discouraged or lose focus and forget that the object of the game is to win the match. It is mind-boggling because everybody above the age of three knows that these self-destructive emotions make players lose. Of course coaches discuss with their players the obvious need for emotional control, but despite their understanding of consequences, their promises of restraint, and their determination, next time out, to eschew the negative emotions that sabotage their play, they are rarely able to do it. They often start out in command of their emotions, but later, after an hour of heated competition and missed opportunities, their destructive emotions again rear their ugly heads. Promises are forgotten, choice expletives erupt or heads droop. Why? Aren’t we intelligent creatures? Can’t we foresee that this behavior will lead to the inevitable debacle? Of course we can, but at that moment, we don’t care. Satisfying our emotional needs take precedence over our intelligent determination to win the match. So we allow our emotions to run, and we lose. Understanding why this sequence of events is so difficult to change requires a deeper look at the relationship between our intelligent minds and our emotional systems. We think our intelligent brains are driving our...

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